Nottingham City Council is making funds available for apprenticeship training for city residents and city businesses through the Apprenticeship Levy.

Nottingham City Council Apprenticeship Levy Process – How it works….

 

What is the Apprenticeship Levy?

The Apprentice Levy is a Government scheme which was introduced in May 2007. It helps businesses access apprenticeship training at a relatively low cost.

How much will it cost my business?

If you’re a small to medium sized business (SME) in Nottingham, and do not currently pay the Apprenticeship Levy, the council can transfer funds to your business to cover the whole cost of apprenticeship training.

Employers with a wage bill over £3m only need to contribute 0.5% of those funds to pay for apprenticeship training.  The Government then tops this up with an additional 10% contribution to the employer’s pot of funding.

What benefits will apprenticeship training bring to my business?

There are many benefits of apprenticeship training, including:

  • Enhanced skills and knowledge across your workforce
  • Greater employee job satisfaction
  • Investment in your business future
  • Increased productivity and sales
  • Stronger staff retention
  • Improved customer and client service

Wider benefits of apprenticeships to Nottingham

Delivering more high-value apprenticeships in Nottingham will ensure more people gain the skills and training they need to build successful careers. This will also benefit the city’s  local employers and community organisations by giving them the highly skilled staff they need, plus it will  deliver economic growth for local communities.

Want to find out more and talk through your options? Please email antony.richards@nottinghamcity.gov.uk

 

FAQ’s

Because it is good business. Skills shortages are still one of the biggest threats to UK businesses. Apprenticeships can help businesses across all industries by offering a route to harness fresh talent. If you have trained staff with the right skills for the job they can do a wider range of tasks and take on new responsibilities - this can help to reduce skill shortages, minimise staff turnover and workplace accidents, and increase productivity.

There are clear financial benefits to employers and their investment in Apprenticeships is repaid many times over. A recent study by the University of Warwick Institute of Employment Research found that the costs of Apprenticeship training are recouped relatively quickly, and that where the investment is nurtured, the returns are significant. Another study by Sheffield University measured the long term financial benefit to investing in Apprenticeships.

Subject to certain conditions, you may also be eligible for an employer grant.

Like all employees, apprentices must still receive a wage.

You must give your apprentice an induction into their role and provide on-the-job training. As with all employees, you are also responsible for the wages of your apprentice.

A learning provider is usually a local college or specialist training organisation responsible for an apprentice's off-the-job training. When you take on an apprentice they will appoint a mentor who will work with you to make sure that the training is well planned. Once the apprentice begins the mentor will follow their progress and deal with any issues that may arise.

Most assessment is carried out in the workplace but there may be a requirement to take some tests.

This varies from programme to programme. Some of the training can be in the work place and other sessions could be in college or with a learning provider. Depending on the type of job being done, or the elements of training being undertaken, it could be one day a week or a block release.

Yes.

Yes and there’s research to prove it. According to figures from UKCES (UK Commission for Employment and Skills), 77% of employers believe Apprenticeships make their organisations more competitive and 81% say they improve higher overall productivity. 92% believe that apprentices lead to a more motivated and satisfied workforce.

Update: Extra Financial Support for Apprenticeships

In the Chancellor's Summer Economic Update, new financial support was announced for employers hiring apprentices that are new to the business (i.e. not existing or recent employees). When an apprentice is hired between 1 August 2020 and 31 January 2021, businesses will be given:

  • £2,000 for each new apprentice they hire under the age of 25
  • £1,500 for each new apprentice aged 25+

This is in addition to the existing £1,000 payment the government provides for new 16-18-year-old apprentices and those aged under 25 with an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP).

For more information, to find out if you're eligible and to discuss your options, please email antony.richards@nottinghamcity.gov.uk