This page provides details of our Equality Pay Gaps for 2021

The Equality Act 2010, states that all employers with 250 or more employees must publish data on their organisation’s gender pay gap.  Currently, this legal duty does not extend to other protected characteristics (age, disability and religious beliefs for example). 

Our ambition is to be a sector leader in inclusive practice, and we recognise that it is important to measure areas where we want to make progress.  So, in addition to reporting the gender pay gap, which is a legal requirement, we continue to report on disability and ethnicity pay gaps.

Our NCC Equality Pay Gaps report provides comprehensive information on our gender, ethnicity and disability pay gaps 2021.  We outline the actions taken to date as well as future action across the Council to close gaps. 

Our Chief Executive, Mel Barrett said: “We are headed in the right direction towards closing pay gaps, and compare favourably with Core City councils and local public sector organisations. We are not shying away from this issue and are taking active steps to bring about positive change. Despite the positive progress, we are not going to become complacent and will continue to ensure that there is equity of pay throughout the organisation. “

Gender

 

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

Mean

2.9%

2.9%

3.3%

3.1%

4.2%

Median

0.5%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

2.6%

  • The mean average pay gap for 2021 is 2.9%, i.e. for every pound earned by the average man, the average woman earns just over 97p. This has remained the same as 2020. The reason for the gap is that males are slightly overrepresented in the highest two quartiles, which means that they earn more on average by a large enough margin to raise their mean hourly rate.  This same as 2020. 

 

  • The median average pay gap for 2021 is 0.5%, i.e. for every pound that the male at the middle of all male earners is paid, the female at the middle of all female earners is paid just under £1. Compared to 2020, there has been a slight increase from 0.0% to 0.5% this year. The reason that the female median hourly rate is lower is because there are proportionally more female earners in the lower quartiles than in the upper quartiles

 

  • Since 2017, there has been a steady decrease and we are headed in the right direction towards closing this pay gap. Despite the positive progress, we are not going to become complacent and will continue to ensure that women are represented throughout the organisation.

Ethnicity

 

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

Mean

5.6%

7.9%

7.4%

7.9%

6.4%

Median

9.4%

8.6%

5.9%

11.7%

4.5%

  • The mean average pay gap for 2021 is 5.6%, i.e. for every pound earned by the average White British employee, the average Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) employee earns just over 94p. There has been a slight decrease from 2020, 7.9% (i.e. for every pound earned by the average White British employee, the average BAME employee earns just over 92p). The reason for the gap is that White British employees are slightly overrepresented in the highest two quartiles, which means that they earn more on average by a large enough margin to raise their mean hourly rate.

 

  • The median average pay gap for 2021 is 9.4%, i.e. for every pound that the White British employee at the middle of all White British earners is paid, the BAME employee at the middle of all BAME earners earns just over 91p. In 2020, the median average pay gap was 8.6%.  This is because there are proportionally more ethnic minority earners in the lower quartiles than in the upper quartiles

 

  • The pay gap is likely to exist because White British employees are slightly overrepresented in the highest two quartiles, which means that they earn more on average by a large enough margin to raise their mean hourly rate and there are proportionally more BAME employees in the lower quartiles than in the upper quartiles.

 

  • We are committed to creating an inclusive culture at the Council where BAME colleagues are provided with opportunities to flourish. We know there is significant work to do to reduce our ethnicity pay gap, nevertheless we are committed across all of the Council to make change, evident, by the decrease from 2020 to 2021.

Disability

 

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

Mean

-1.1%

-2.0%

-1.8%

-1.2%

0.9%

Median

-10.4%

-5.8%

0.0%

-0.1%

-6.8%

  • The mean average pay gap for 2021 is minus 1.1%, i.e. for every pound earned by the average non-disabled employee, the average disabled employee earns £1.01. This has slightly decreased from 2020, pay gap -2% (i.e. for every pound earned by the average non-disabled employee, the average disabled employee earns £1.02).  The reason that the pay gap is marginally in favour of disabled employees because they are very evenly spread throughout the organisation's quartiles, with slightly higher representation in the upper quartiles (see Quartile Representation)

 

  • The median average pay gap for 2021 is minus 10.4%, i.e. for every pound that the non-disabled employee at the middle of all non-disabled earners is paid, the disabled employee at the middle of all disabled earners earns just under £1.10. In 2020, the median average pay gap was minus 5.8% (i.e. for every pound that the non-disabled employee at the middle of all non-disabled earners is paid, the disabled employee at the middle of all disabled earners earns just under £1.06).   The reason that disabled workers have a higher median pay is because there are far fewer disabled employees, and they are very evenly spread throughout the organisation's quartiles, with slight over representation in the upper quartiles.

 

  • Despite the positive picture in terms of disability pay gap, we are committed to ensuring that there is an inclusive culture at NCC and that accessibility remains a priority. We have included some actions in the report which will help us to achieve this.

Taking Action to close our pay gaps

We are continually developing ways to support and develop our staff, including embedding Equality, Diversity and Inclusion within our culture and developing ongoing learning and resources to support leaders to work in an inclusive way. Our measures include introducing programmes such as the Change Academy, which responds to calls from staff for more development opportunities and will help the council to ‘grow its own’ to drive the transformation and improvement of the organisation.

Transformation Project Manager & Business Analyst Claire Knight, who is taking part in the Change Academy, said: “To be able to apply for a programme that had such open criteria and was not limited by previous experience or grade was incredibly rewarding. It highlights the investment the City Council has made in its own workforce and has provided me with a fantastic opportunity to learn and apply new knowledge which has led me down a different and rewarding career path and has meant a significant increase to my salary.”

Dal Singh, said:  “I moved from my role as a Skills Access Hub Adviser to the Change Academy.  I am contributing to significant transformation projects currently taking place at the Council.  This opportunity has enabled me to obtain a qualification in Project Management and Business Analysis.  This has also meant I am enhancing my CV with both a technical qualification and experience to go with it, which I am sure will put me in good stead for career progression.”

Please read the full report